Monthly Archives: December 2016

London Countryway- Finishing off this trail in the Thames Estuary. Approaching the coal cranes beside the abandoned Tilbury Power Station

The London Countryway confronted

Back in August, I wrote about a particular trail I have been completing this year. This was my report on having completed around half of the London Countryway, a ‘forgotten’ trail that was bought to my attention by Hillplodder. As it turned out, I was nowhere near the half way point.

Throughout 2016, in between other walks, in particular a backpacking jaunt along the Ridgeway and some walking in Sicily and other places, many Sundays were spent travelling to and from various railway stations on the Countryway as I worked my way round in linear fashion.

Following the London Countryway between Marlow and High Wycombe. The gentle and pretty landscape progressively became more agricultural on the

Following the London Countryway between Marlow and High Wycombe. The gentle and pretty landscape as I left the Thames became progressively more agricultural on the northern sections

The climb up and out of the Thames basin took me up into the Chilterns, crossing the grain, as it were, saw me rollercoasting up and down their modest ridges. Views were few and largely unspectacular. The going was mostly pretty easy on both legs and lungs. I had enjoyed the first half of my London Countryway walk, below the River Thames, I found the second part to its north very different. The flavour of the trail altered dramatically, if steadily, the further I moved East

The sunken lanes in the Chilterns bewtween Marlow and High Wycombe were a delight and bought to mind the countless feet that must have passed this way over the millennia

The sunken lanes in the Chilterns were a delight and bought to mind the countless feet that must have passed this way over the millennia

As I spent too long away from the trail with work, family, holiday and other commitments, the year drew on and my travelling time to and from start and finish each day got longer as weekend rail delays and rail replacement services (ha!) were put in place and my daylight hours on trail grew shorter. I took to driving to stations for the start and then travelling back to the start point and car by rail in the dark. Eventually, having a few days holiday that needed taking, I did a bite of four consecutive days on the Countryway. As Mrs Three Points of the Compass was joining me for three of these, overnight accommodation was firmly stipulated. Much as I enjoyed the company for a change, and the good lady could actually see what I had been going on about all year, this particular section covered was between Kings Langley and Broxbourne. Which, apart from St. Albans itself, was probably the least interesting section of the whole trail.

The redundant red brick Anglican All Saints church at East Horndon glows red in the light of the setting sun. Now victim to new roads, bypasses, shrinking rural population and now serving an economically depressed area, it sees few visitors. The Grade II* 15th century church is now in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. Its two storey transepts are possibly uniques. British Listed Buildings notes that "this remarkable church has had a chequered history of decay, theft and vandalism"

The redundant red brick Anglican Church of All Saints at East Horndon glows red in the light of the setting sun. Now victim to new roads, bypasses, shrinking rural population and now serving an economically depressed area, it sees few visitors. The Grade II* 15th century church is now in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. Its two storey transepts are possibly unique. British Listed Buildings notes that “this remarkable church has had a chequered history of decay, theft and vandalism”

I slightly regretted leaving completion of this walk until so late in the year. The many fields crossed became shorn of crops, ploughed and bare. As rains set in still later, trail runners became caked in mud. There was still a beauty to the countryside but it came less easy to the eye. I found myself pausing more frequently at churches, a curfew tower and other interesting buildings just to sate my need for variety. Perhaps I should have loitered more in some of the lovely forests crossed, but once walking, I often tend to be ‘head down and go’.

As with the first half of the walk, south of the River Thames, I frequently found myself joining, if only for just a few miles, designated and named trails.  For most of the time though, the Countryway was following ancient Rights of Way. It was very noticeable how different land owners regarded such rights. Some paths were overgrown and unloved at best, blocked and impeded at worst. Yet within just half a mile, signage was clear, stiles were repaired, drivers of tractors gave a wave. Probably the worst treatment was on the Essex flatlands where it was very obvious that the round footpath discs had been crudely levered off from where they had been set, and put up where the landowner preferred people to walk.

Many scrappy horse paddocks in Essex were crossed on the London Countryway, however here, inlike other parts of the trail, land owners has scant regard for the needs of walkers. Signage was moved and countless electric fences erected with no easy way of crossing them. On many an occasion I was forced to throw a pack and oles across and crawl in the mud below a wire

Many scrappy horse paddocks in Essex were crossed on the London Countryway, however here, unlike on other parts of the trail, many land owners have scant regard for the needs of walkers. Signage was moved or even removed and countless electric fences erected with no easy way of crossing or circumventing them. On many an occasion I was forced to throw a pack and poles across and crawl in the mud below a wire. On this occasion I was able to squeeze between the strands.

The changing colours of the leaves on the trees and their eventual fall and coating of the ground in the shoulder season is always a joy. 2016 was frequently unseasonably warm and despite the leaves having fallen, temperatures were frequently warm enough for shirtsleeves. However I relished the occasional rain, hail and cold weather when it infrequently manifested itself. Leaves covering paths on forest trails occasionally made the going confusing. Another unforeseen disadvantage of my direction of passage at this time of year was the low winter sun being frequently in my eyes. This actually became wearisome at times though it is difficult to complain because it might just as easily have been constantly obscured with rain clouds disgorging themselves upon me.

A frozen Lea Navigation

An infrequent cold day. A frozen Lea Navigation

Red Kite (Mivus milvus) wheeled in the air above my head every day, especially through the Chilterns

The distinctive Red Kite (Milvus milvus) wheeled in the air above my head on many days, especially through the Chilterns

Another victim of the year drawing on was my reducing frequency of encounters with fauna and flora. Other than road kill on the few sections of roadwalking, it was the vivid splashes of pink and orange Spindle in the hedgerows and berry laden shrubs attracting down the winter thrushes, Redwing and Fieldfare, moving in from Scandinavia, that were most noticeable.

 

I spent an hour exploring the walls and banks of the Norman Motte and Bailey 'Berkhamsted Castle' , adjacent to the railway station, prior to beginning one of my days on the London Countryway

I spent an hour exploring the walls and banks of the Norman Motte and Bailey ‘Berkhamsted Castle’ , adjacent to the railway station, prior to beginning one of my days on the London Countryway

Just occasionally I would come to a site of note and would divert slightly to explore, or spend a little more time. I even found a few minutes to indulge in the odd sketch at one or two rest stops. It is important to take time out on occasion otherwise just what is the point of following any trail. Though I must confess that when I took time to wander round the Mausoleum built by Sir Francis Dashwood, founder of the infamous Hell Fire Club, I declined joining the hoards of punters being coerced into forking out what I thought an extortionate amount to briefly pop into the over-hyped Hellfire Caves.

The large unroofed Dashwood mausoleum is visible from miles away. The hexagonal structure, formed by a series of linked triumphal arches, houses the remains of house the memorials of Sir Francis Dashwood, Lord le Despencer, 2nd Bart. (1708-81) his family and friends. The rebuilt Church of St Lawrence, seen beyond, has a large gilded ball, fitted up inside for his drinking parties, on top of the tower.

The large unroofed Dashwood mausoleum is visible from miles away. The hexagonal Grade I structure, formed by a series of linked triumphal arches, houses the memorials of Sir Francis Dashwood, Lord le Despencer, 2nd Bart. (1708-81) his family and friends. The rebuilt Church of St Lawrence, seen beyond, has a large gilded ball, fitted up inside for his drinking parties, on top of the tower.

Local protests

Local protests

As I moved round my meandering semi-circle above London, the affluence of the countryside dissipated. Incidences of fly-tipping were encountered more frequently, yapping dogs appeared from below gates with no attention from homeowners, there were signs everywhere of industry and work having disappeared. Sadly, moving into parts of Essex that probably see few visitors, I began to see parts of the country that had been largely abandoned by officialdom, to its detriment. I looked for signs of recovery but could find few. Many locals were protesting against the most recent of indignities, a proposal to run another crossing of the Thames through their back-garden.

Every so often my timing was out. The day I arrived at Coalhouse Fort on the banks of the Thames, I was greeted by this sign

Every so often my timing was out. The day I arrived at Coalhouse Fort on the banks of the Thames, I was greeted thus…

Living as I do on the North Kent Marshes, I do find beauty in the wide open spaces, scarred by industry. It was a similar landscape that I walked into on the Essex marshes. Prior to then, there was also much of interest. The Lea Valley was an example of how a previously depressed area could be turned around. But the important Thames side forts had few visitors, the site of the docking of Empire Windrush was largely ignored beyond a belated small plaque at Thurrock and there was little celebration of Elizabeth I’s speech before the Spanish Armada, other than one of the strangest pieces of graffiti I have come across- on the seawall below the closed Tilbury Power Station.

"I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too"

“I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too”- Graffiti on the seawall at Tilbury, Essex

The London Countryway was far more than a walk of two halves, it was a walk of many parts. Some days were very short. When Mr and Mrs Three Points of the Compass were walking to the station from Broxbourne at the end of our brief jaunt, we decided to walk an extra four miles to the next station down the line, that was the total mileage for that day. Regardless of daily mileage, I took twenty-two days to complete the London Countyway. I could have quite easily completed it in quite a few days less. I wandered off to view churches and towers, I got lost in Epping Forest until I simply took a bearing and strode through the thickets. Quite a few miles were added on by station links. I had thought that the trail would total around 215 miles, by the end, I had covered 251 miles.

Ambresbury Banks are the remains of an Iron Age hill fort in the lovely Epping Forest, Essex

Ambresbury Banks are the remains of an Iron Age hill fort in the lovely Epping Forest, Essex

I mentioned before that I undertook this walk as a charitable exercise, raising a few quid toward those youngsters who undertake the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme. I was pleased to beat my modest target.  While I doubt I will repeat completing a walk for charity again, it is not really within my comfort zone asking for money, I am looking forward to 2017 when I will, at last, complete my last few miles on the North Downs Way and begin one of the other longer paths in the South East of England. As to further afield, we shall have to see.

The end of the London Countryway. Crossing the River Thames from Tilbury in Essex back to my start point in Gravesend, Kent

The end of the London Countryway. Three Points of the Compass crossing the River Thames from Tilbury in Essex back to the start point in Gravesend, Kent

To finish off this blog post, would I recommend the London Countryway? Absolutely. There are far better trails elsewhere in the UK and further afield. But as a long distance walk in the South East of England, it is an excellent choice. It has variety, surprises, good country walking and an acceptable percentage of town and road walking. In my opinion it certainly beats that better known National Trail, the London LOOP hands down. Though I am sure there will be many who would disagree with me. Possibly it was the fact that I met far fewer people on the walk that clinched it for me…

While not ignoring the vision and creativity of the paths originator, Keith Chesterton, the more recent research and ever helpful guidance provided by Des de Moor is terrific. As usual though, I found myself transferring directions to an O.S. map in advance, then reading both written directions and his commentary on the way home from each section, preferring to discover things for myself on the trail.

Onward, into 2017…

Yet another unexpected delight. A brief halt at the Water Gate, entrance to Tilbury Fort

Yet another unexpected delight. A brief halt at the Water Gate, entrance to Tilbury Fort

Fixating on the small stuff- an Every Day Carry

OK, time to fess up. This post has got very little to do with hiking. I never, ever, carry the stuff I am chatting about here on any hike. It is bulky, heavy and other than one or two of the contents, mostly of little practical use on any backpacking trip.

What it is, is an example of what I am prone to do. Which is plan. Learn from my mistakes and inaction and be better prepared for repeated events in the future. I have been like this since I was a nipper.

Every day I go to work I have a pack slung over my shoulder. For the great majority of my time I work in London, but I always have a torch, screwdriver set, multi tool, water bottle and any number of other items in various pockets of my battered urban commuting 35lt pack from The North Face. Also, being in England, I have a waterproof  packed, every single day of the year…

The Vanquest EDC SLim Maximizer pouch that Three Points of the Compass carries on every work day and trips away from the house by car

The Vanquest EDC Slim Maximizer pouch that Three Points of the Compass carries on every work day and trips away from the house by car

Recently I have been pulling much of my oddments together into one of the fantastic Vanquest EDC Slim Maximizer Organisers. I have also added a few recent purchases and am now content that my Every Day Carry (EDC) has the tools and other equipment that have not only proved themselves of use to me over the years, but now also give me a little more practicality and usefulness. I can put many of the contents to use most weeks, and on occasion most weekdays. It can get slung in the car for trips away and visits to my Mum where there may be the odd task that requires completing, as her battered old red biscuit tin under the sink with its even older selection of poor tools isn’t quite cutting it these days.

I have packed a lot into my EDC. Not only can I carry out a number of repairs, alteration, fixing or general ‘handyman’ tasks that require attention, but I also carry a modicum of First Aid items and small selection of hygiene products that will see me through the very occasional unexpected overnight stay.

Vanquest EDC Maximizer with contents installed

Vanquest EDC Maximizer with contents installed

Hygiene and First Aid

I have included a minimum of hygiene equipment for the occasional and unexpected overnight stop. Two of the great little compressed towels are incorporated. These can be used with the mini dropper bottle of Dr. Bronners Castille soap. This is a very concentrated and versatile soap that I can also use for shaving, brushing teeth or washing out clothes. A small compact Avid razor is included. These are of a very thin profile and I wish they were still made as I have few left. The mirror is one of the mini Star Flash acrylic mirrors (in a baggie to prevent scratches) and the toothbrush is a two-part affair from Muji. I also carry a small dropper bottle of hand sanitizer. For convenience, I have this more easily available and packed outside of the wash kit.

My First Aid kit is basic, a few band aids, dressings, tape, a couple of alcohol wipes, nitrile gloves and a little medication: Ibuprofen and Piriton. There are a few extra meds in my ‘midget’ EDC kit that I also carry. This is so very heavily based on that devised by The Urban Prepper that I need not show it here. Though I do also include 5m of 1mm spectra cord, different meds, a razor blade, emergency cufflinks (yes, really) and a couple of other items in my ‘Altoids’ tin in addition to his list.

Electronics

Electronics in my Vanquest EDC are limited but useful. I have included a high quality Micro/USB charge cable, folding Mu USB plug. The 200mm long Innergie charge and sync cable is very adaptable. This will fit USB to Micro/Mini/30 pin Apple, I also have a Lightning adaptor on the end. Spare batteries carried are two CR2016 and two CR2032. All of this is in an especially tough and waterproof baggie. Two torches and a flood light are carried- the Thrunite T14 Penlight takes two AAA batteries (fitted), has a Cree XP-G2 LED  and delivers four forms of light:

  • Firefly (0.3 lumens for up to 137 hours)
  • Low (24 lumens for up to 12 hours)
  • High (252 lumens for up to 51 minutes)
  • Strobe (252 lumens for up to 90 minutes)

As back up to this, the Photon Freedom Micro belies its diminutive dimensions. While it can deliver any strength of light from dim through to its maximum 5 lumens, the almost indestructible body holds two CR2016 or one CR2032 batteries. and will run for up to eighteen hours. Also in the kit are two AAA batteries stored in AAA to AA cell converters.

These will also fit the Lil Larry Nebo floodlight. This is handy piece of kit that will provide task lighting. It has a magnetic base so can be used for changing tyres or during power outage. While in its full length it takes three AAA batteries (fitted), it can also have a section of its length removed so that just two AAA batteries can be utilised. In full configuration it provides:

  • High (250 lumens for up to 3 hours
  • Low (95 lumens for up to 10 hours)
  • Red Hazard flasher (for up to 10 hours)

    The contents of my EDC kit. It is pretty much stuffed to the gills

    The contents of my EDC kit. It is pretty much stuffed to the gills

Leatherman Raptor shears

The Leatherman Raptors are tough enough to cut a penny into quarters

The Leatherman Raptors are tough enough to cut a penny into quarters and the strap cutter is quickly and easily bought into use when required

These are an amazing piece of kit and really well made. Invariably they get used most as simply a better set of scissors than those on the Leatherman Charge carried in my EDC. However the 320HC stainless steel blades on these shears will cut through just about anything I may encounter- clothes, leather, webbing, straps etc. The tiny serrations on one blade really grip well and prevent items sliding out of the blades. There is a carbide glass breaker for auto glass windows in the base and a seat belt cutter that is easily deployed yet remains locked away until required. Obviously this can be more often used simply as a box cutter. There is handy little ring cutter placed discretely and un-noticed under the handle too. I seldom require the 5cm ruler and have never used the oxygen tank wrench incorporated. One of the best features of these 163g shears though, apart from their high quality, is their ability to swiftly fold away, or open, easily, with simple little lock buttons. They do come with a holster for First Responders, but I don’t include that in my kit. Instead I have it fixed to a mini carabiner hanging from the Maximiser pouch key fob and keep it in place, nested against my Leatherman bit extender, with one of the rare earth magnets in my kit.

Bit, driver and drill system

This kit has a complete and highly adaptable system. It mostly involves the excellent Leatherman Charge. Mine is one of the older models. Most frequently tasks will utilise the bit holder in the Leatherman Charge, possibly with the Leatherman Bit Driver Extender, extended still further if necessary with 1/4″ hex extender. Or the 1/4″ extender can be used just with the Victorinox Bitwrench. I can also use one of my three drill bits in any combination here. While it takes a little time, I have drilled clean through 2 inches of wood with the 6mm drill bit attached to the Leatherman Charge.

The Gator adapter will fit a wide range shapes of head- nuts, screws, bolts, rings, hooks etc.

The Gator adaptor will fit a wide range shapes of head- nuts, screws, bolts, rings, hooks etc.

The majority of the bits included in my EDC are the ingenious flat, double ended, Leatheman Bits plus a couple of extras. In total there are 44 bits in my EDC, plus four tiny Phillips and flat head mini bits. Two sockets are also included. A dedicated 10mm head/ 1/4″ hex drive, while the Gator socket adaptor grip will fit heads from 7mm-19mm.

With the contents of my EDC I can loosen and tighten most common and uncommon screw heads, bolts and nuts from 1mm to 19mm. While Torx head bits are included, what I am looking for, to eventually include, are some 4mm micro bits for Security Torx heads. As an aid to this capability, a small adjustable spanner or the (smallest available) Knipex water pump pliers can be pulled from the kit. The pliers have recently replaced the small set of mole grips I used to carry.

1/4" hex drive drill bits can be used in a number of configurations

1/4″ hex drive drill bits can be used in a number of configurations

Solkoa Grip-S handles

Solkoa Grip-S handles with 24" flexible wire saw fitted

Solkoa Grip-S handles with 130mm wood saw blade fitted

Separated Solkoa Grip-S handles with 24" flexible wire saw fitted

Separated Solkoa Grip-S handles with 28″ flexible wire saw fitted

Though expensive, the hard anodised 6061 aluminium Solkoa Grip-S handles (there are two, joined together) are very useful. Not only can any standard flexible wire saw be fixed in using the set screws in each handle, and I include a 28″ wire saw in this EDC kit, but the handles can also take any round or hexagonal drive tool, up to 1/4″  diameter. A two ended flat/Phillips head bit is stored in the handle and the two handles are quickly separated by loosening one of the set screws with the flat screwdriver on the Gerber Shard pry bar. Any universal saw blade can be fitted into the Grip-S handles. I could have included a couple of the small jigsaw blades, which fit, but instead included two larger 130mm blades. One for wood (and nails) the other for metal.

Other items

I won’t go into detail on every item as reading from the list below they really are self-explanatory. There is an emergency twenty pound note secreted in the rear of the notebook. Tape measure gets used frequently. The titanium short-handled spoon is a ‘must have’, nappy pins can be used for hanging washing to dry and a thousand other uses, as can the paper clips and bobby pins. The lengths of wire can be bent into hooks for retrieving items or combined with the rare earth magnets to similar purpose. I would add a sachet of Sugru but it goes off too quickly if stored out of the fridge.

Item Description Notes
Pouch Vanquest EDC Slim Maximizer  
Combination padlock   TSA compliant
Adjustable spanner Small- 100mm. Jaws open to 13mm Unknown make
Pliers Knipex Cobra water pump pliers. Grips up to 27mm wide

 

Model 87 01 125. The ‘125’ in the model number refers to their length
Leatherman Raptor- Folding medical shears 420HC stainless steel scissors, strap cutter, ruler (1.9″/50mm), oxygen tank wrench, ring cutter, carbide tip glass breaker  
Leatherman Charge Ti  multitool Titanium scales. needlenose pliers, regular pliers, hard wire cutters, wire cutters, crimper, wire stripper, S30V knife blade, 420HC serrated knife with cutting hook, saw, scissors, 8″/19cm ruler, can opener, bottle opener, wood/metal file, diamond coated file, large bit driver (double ended 1/8″ / 3/32″ flat screwdriver bit fitted), small bit driver (small, double ended flat/Phillips screwdriver bit fitted), medium flat screwdriver. Pocket clip fitted  

 

Leatherman bit driver extension Fits into bit driver of Leatherman Charge, other end accepts Leatherman bits and 1/4″ hex bits 10mm socket is stowed attached to end of driver
1/4″ extension piece 75mm, magnetic  
Victorinox Bitwrench 1/4″ hex drive VICBW
23 double ended Leatherman bits – Hex 3/32″ ; 5/64″
– Hex 1/16″ ; .050″
– Square bit #2 ; #3
– Square bit #1 ; pozi #3

– Pozi#1; pozi#2
– Torx #10 ; #15
– Torx #20 ; #25
– Torx #27 ; #30
– Phillips #0 ; #3
– Phillips #1 ; #2

– Phillips #1-2; screwdriver 3/16″
– Screwdrivers 3/32″ ; 1/8″
– Screwdrivers 5/32″ ; 3/16″
– Screwdrivers 7/32″ ; 1/4″
– Hex 1.5mm ; 2mm
– Hex 2.5mm ; 3mm
– Hex 4mm ; 5mm
– Hex 6mm ; 1/4″
– Hex 7/32″ ; 3/16″
– Hex 5/32 ; 9/64″
– Hex 1/8″ ; 7/64″
2 x – Phillips; flat tip eyeglasses screwdriver

In two Leatherman bit holders with one mini bit and one double ended bit in the Leatherman Charge.

46 bit options, though a couple are duplicated.

Wolfteeth universal gator socket adapter,with 1/4″ drive adapter Fits 7mm – 19mm sockets. Also fits various nuts, screws, hooks, bolt heads, broken taps and knobs  
Socket- 10mm head/ 1/4″ hex drive   A common size
Gerber Shard pry bar In addition to pry, has Phillips head, two flat screwdrivers, wire stripper and bottle opener  
Solkoa Grip-S handles 2 x hard anodised handles with set screws joined together over double ended Phillips/flat head screwdriver Will hold any round or hexagonal, up to 1/4″ head, tool or any standard flexible wire saw
28″ flexible wire saw (in baggie) For use with Grip-S handles  
Stanley 152mm wood saw blade For use with Grip-S handles Model STA21192
Stanley 152mm metal saw blade For use with Grip-S handles Model STA22132
Retractable steel razor With snap off stainless steel blades  
Excel aluminium handle Handle has adjustable jaws. Inside handle are six various mini file needles and an additional sewing awl Model 70001
Hex drive drill bits- 6mm, 4mm,2mm For use with either Grip-S handles, Leatherman Charge or 1/4″ drive turn key  
1/4″ plastic turn key    
Double ended steel craft tool Arrow point and spatula end  
2m steel tape measure Muji Code: 8215607
1m x 16swg tin plated copper wire    
1m x plastic wrapped 12swg steel wire Use with magnets for retrieving lost screws, keys etc.  
4 x small rare earth magnets   Three stored attached to the bit holder and one attached to the bit extender keep tools in place in the pouch
Small tin with slide top Contents:

2 x stainless steel M6 hex bolt, nut, washer

3 x zinc plated wood screw

2 x small countersunk brass woodscrew

2 x rawlplug

2 x nails

1 x small, 1 x large stainless steel screw eye

1 x stainless steel split ring

 
2 x nappy pin    
1 x paper clip

1 x medium paper clip (insulated)

1 x small paper clip

   
2 x bobby pins    
1 x binder clip    
Anker Powerline USB/Micro 3′ braided cable. Very tough double-braided Aramid exterior and toughened Aramid fiber core
Mu folding USB plug Single USB outlet. 1amp There are two USB oulet Mu plugs available, this is sufficient for my needs
Photon Freedom Micro Button torch  
Thrunite T14 Penlight Cree XP-G2 LED

Firefly: 0.3 lumens, 137hours
Low: 24 lumens, 12hours
High: 252 lumens, 51minutes
Strobe: 252 lumens, 90 minutes

With 2 x Alkaline AAA (Duracell Plus Power).

One cell reversed to prevent accidental discharge

Lil Larry Nebo- floodlight Magnetic base, C.O.B. LED chip technology

High: 250 lumen, 3 hours

Low: 95 lumen, 10 hours

Red hazard flasher:  10 hours

3 X Alkaline AAA (NEBO). One cell reversed. Light can be reduced in length with just 2 AAA batteries but I keep mine full length
2 x Li-ion Duracell AAA batteries Stored in Sodial AAA to AA battery cell converters  
2 x CR2016 batteries    
2 X CR2016 batteries    
Sharpie pen, stainless steel Black, refillable, 0.4mm fine point Model 1849740
Zebra F701 ball pen, stainless steel Black medium Model 44970
Faber Castell Perfect Pencil With eraser and integrated extender/sharpener  
Backpocket Journal Tomoe River Edition From Curnow Bookbinding & Leatherwork
£20   Stored in back of notebook (above)
5m x 550 paracord In quick deploy hank  
2 x velcro cable ties    
6″ Nite Ize Gear Tie    
2 x 400mm cable tie

1 x 150mm cable tie

  These are threaded into the lining of the pouch interior
2 x mini-biner    
1m gaffer tape   Flat wound onto silicone release paper
Sewing kit 2m black Gütermann Sew-All  thread

1 x large black button, 2 x small white buttons

Threader

2 x No. 7 embroidery/crewel needles

1 x No. 18 chenille needle

1 x Microtex 60/8 machine needle (for use with Excel handle)

Stored in SD card case
Spoon Small, Sea to Summit, hard anodised alloy  
Mini Bic lighter With 1m electricians tape wound on to it Has quick release mini  zip tie on it to prevent accidental discharge of gas
Hand sanitiser Alcohol free  In mini dropper bottle
Hygiene kit Mirror (mini StarFlash), Razors (Avid, fold flat), 20ml Dr Bronner’s liquid soap in mini dropper bottle, folding toothbrush, 2 x compressed travel towels All in 130mm x 120mm Aloksac
Uncle Bills Sliver Gripper Tweezers With holder  
Fox 40 Micro whistle    
Shelby mini tin opener    
First Aid kit 2 x alcohol wipes, 2 x plasters (silver), 1 strip ‘cut to size’ plaster (10cm), 1 x dressing (small), 1 x Melolin dressing (5cm x 5cm), 4 x 45cm strips Leukotape, 30cm x 1cm zinc oxide tape, 30cm x 2.5cm Transpore tape, 4 x Ibuprofen, 7 x Piriton.

1 pair Nitrile gloves

All in baggies

 

 

Mixed dried fruit

Trail snacks- dried fruit

Snacking in the Lake District, 2015

Three Points of the Compass snacking on dried fruit in the English Lake District, autumn 2015

The advantages of snacking on trail mix throughout a long days hiking are well known. Keeping a steady inward trickle of calories avoids the energy slumps that can come up so slowly but manifest themselves so suddenly.

There are many favourites amongst hikers, jelly babies and jelly beans, Snickers and Mars bars, energy gels and drinks, protein bars and oak cakes, nuts and Jaffa cakes. I have chatted before on one particular sticky favourite of mine- Sesame Snaps. Many embrace the various pre-prepared trail mixes that are produced though it is almost as easy to produce a far more flavoursome mix yourself.

Dried fruit

Another favourite of mine is dried fruit. These usually contain only naturally occurring sugars (fructose) and a bare minimum of salt. Some fruits such as cranberries, cherries, strawberries and mango may have had a sweetener added either prior to or following drying. Others such as cherries, papaya, kiwi and pineapple may have been soaked in heated sugar syrup (which draws out the moisture and preserves the fruit) and are more properly candied rather than dried fruit. However it is often possible to find fruits that have not undergone either such adulteration.

Drying fruit for later consumption is one of the oldest methods of preserving food. Figs, dates, apricots and apples have long been prepared in this manner, as have raisins, which today form about half of the dried fruit consumed globally. Most of the nutritional value of the fruit is retained. Of additional benefit is the low to moderate Glycaemic Index (GI) of dried fruit. Therefore more slowly digested, absorbed and metabolised. This means a slower rise in blood sugar level and insulin level due to the slow release of glucose into the bloodstream, far more suited to an activity such as hiking over a sustained period.

Another advantage of consuming dried fruit is that as the water (weight) is withdrawn, the nutrients are condensed into a smaller and lighter product. While I don’t use a dehydrator myself, many hikers and backpackers like to produce fruit ‘leathers’ with a dehydrator that not only provide the aforementioned calorific boost and nutritional value, but are also further reduced in bulk.

Some pre-prepared bags of dried fruit are small and expensive- however very tasty! These small bags of baked and dried strawberries and pineapple only provide around a 100kcal each. Each 35g portion contains 24g carbohydrate, of which 20g is naturally occurring fruit sugar

Some pre-prepared bags of dried fruit are small and expensive- however very tasty! These small bags of baked and dried strawberries and pineapple provide around a 100kcal each. Each 35g portion contains 24g carbohydrate, of which 20g is naturally occurring fruit sugar

 

Other advantages are reduced or zero fat and increased amounts of fibre over same sized servings pre-drying. Dried fruits are also often a good provider of antioxidants, which can fight heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes and some degenerative diseases of the brain.

While I do occasionally buy one or more of the small pre-prepared pouches of fruit, I tend to get the larger bags, usually intended for cooking with. A good tasty mix can be made, possibly adding a few cracked nuts, and any amount can be taken in a zip-lock baggie. The mix shown above is some of that left over from making the family Christmas Puds! It consists of currants, raisins, sultanas, cranberries and blueberries. I find the chopped dried dates, prunes and glacé cherries which are also part of the finished mix too sticky to use as trail snacks. But I do like to take dried mango (a favourite), apricots and figs with me.

Another bonus is that dried fruit is not difficult to find. They have the advantage of being pretty much universally available in many shops. If not in the baking area, then in ‘healthy eating’ or snacking parts of the shelves.

 

 

 

Sign of the month- a Scottish milestone

While the Romans introduced measured distance markers to Britain in 55 BC, most surviving milestones are much younger. The majority date from after the development of the roads that followed effective mapping in the seventeenth century. Many Turnpike trusts were formed (from 1663) to manage the condition of deteriorating roads and in 1766 it became compulsory for the trusts to mark every mile. Design and material used for milestones varied. In 1878, highways in Scotland became the responsibility of the newly formed county councils, as did the milestones on their roads. This cast iron milestone on the A81 indicates the distance to the Aberfoil Inn and Glasgow’s Royal Exchange