Monthly Archives: August 2017

Oxford English History

A library for historians…

The Oxford History of England

The title- ‘The Oxford History of England‘ may seem somewhat odd, but it should be remembered that historical use of the word England actually embraced Wales, could mean Great Britain or the United Kingdom, even the British Empire. It is a history that relates to a state structure built around an English monarchy and the subsequent Crown Parliament. I don’t get hung up over it but I can imagine many a Scot or Irishman might.

These volumes have not been on my bookshelf for long but they more than adequately fill a gap that I had. Sadly, my lovely brother-in-law Peter passed and my sister gave me his set of The Oxford History of England. I was delighted to have these books as they are an excellent series of well-written histories, broken down into ‘chapter’ volumes.

The series was commissioned by Oxford University Press and the first volume appeared in 1934. The series has extended beyond its original remit and there have been a number of updates, edited versions and additions made over the years. In addition, a ‘New Oxford History of England‘ was commissioned in 1992. The new series is incomplete so far.

A handy, one volume 'aide memoire' is A Short History of England. Simon Jenkins brings his journalistic skills to distilling down centuries of convoluted, complicated and contentious history into just a few hundred pages. Light on social history, big on monarchy, this book still works well as a continual read in simple language

A handy, one volume ‘aide memoire’ is A Short History of England. Author Simon Jenkins brings his journalistic skills to distilling down centuries of convoluted, complicated and contentious history into just a few hundred pages. Light on social history, big on monarchy, this book still works well as a continual read in simple language

Books in featured image:

Volume I: Roman Britain, Peter Salway. Oxford University Press, 1981. ISBN 0 19 8217172 X

Volume I B: The English Settlements, J.N.L. Myres. Oxford University Press, 1986. ISBN 0 19 821719 6

Volume II: Anglo-Saxon England, Sir Frank Stenton. Oxford University Press, third edition 1971. ISBN 0 19 821716 1

Volume III: From Domesday Book to Magna Carta 1087-1216, A.L. Poole. Oxford University Press, second edition 1987. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0 19 821707 2

Volume IV: The Thirteenth Century, 1216–1307, Sir Maurice Powicke. Oxford University Press, second edition, 1962. ISBN 0 19 821708 0

Volume V: The Fourteenth Century, May McKisack. Oxford University Press, 1992. ISBN 0 19 821712 9

Volume VI: The Fifteenth Century, 1399–1485, E.F. Jacob. Oxford University Press, 1988. ISBN 0 19 821714 5

Volume VII: The Earlier Tudors, 1485–1558, J.D. Mackie. Oxford University Press, 1991. ISBN 0 19 821706 4

Volume VIII: The Reign of Elizabeth 1558-1603, J.B. Black. Oxford University Press, second edition 1992. ISBN 0 19 821701 3

Volume IX: The Early Stuarts, 1603–1660, Godfrey Davies. Oxford University Press, second edition 1988. ISBN 0 19 821704 8

Volume X: The Later Stuarts, 1660–1714. Sir George Clark. Oxford University Press, second edition 1992. ISBN 0 19 821702 1

Volume XI: The Whig Supremacy, Basil Williams, revised by C.H. Stuart. Oxford University Press, second edition 1992. ISBN 0 19 821710 2

Volume XII: The Reign of George III, 1760–1815, J. Steven Watson. Oxford University Press, 1987. ISBN 0 19 821713 7

Volume XIII: The Age of Reform, 1815–1870, Sir Llewellyn Woodward. Oxford University Press, second edition 1990. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0 19 821711 0

Volume XIV: England, 1870–1914, Sir Robert Ensor. Oxford University Press, 1990. ISBN 0 19 821705 6

Volume XV: English History, 1914–1945. A.J.P. Taylor. Oxford University Press, 1990 ISBN 0 19 821715 3

The Handbook of British Mammals. Corbet and Southern

A library for naturalists…

The Handbook of British Mammals

Corbet and Southern

This volume is probably more a historical document today but use it alongside any modern Field Guide and it works wonderfully. Just don’t go looking for Coypu in East Anglia today, they were probably eradicated by the early 1990s.

Part of the seven and a half pages that covers the Harvest Mouse in Great Britain

Part of the seven and a half pages that covers the Harvest Mouse in Great Britain in The Handbook of British Mammals

As usual, Collins publish excellent Field Guides to Mammals. Such a volume works brilliantly alongside a good reference work such that by Corbet and Southern

As usual, Collins publish excellent Field Guides to Mammals. Such a volume works brilliantly alongside a good reference work such that by Corbet and Southern

I suppose at some point I ought to purchase the most up to date version of a handbook to British Mammals, however much of the salient historical and biological data in my volume is still correct and I supplement this with species specific detail in other volumes on my bookshelves. Perhaps the most relevant aspect is that not only am I a naturalist, but I am a reader of books too. Corbet and Southern’s volume has prose as well as fact.

Good information is included on the Classification of Mammals and I am especially pleased that detail on extinct species is included, such as Brown Bear and Wolf. Hopefully in my time the latter species may be reintroduced to Scotland.

Line drawings of dentition and skulls are included and the systematic accounts, each written by an authority, are broken down in to Description, Measurements, Distribution, Habitat, Behaviour, Food, Breeding, Predators and Mortality, and Relations with Man.

A very good, reasonably priced series of books was published by Whittet Books. nUpdated and new editions are avaialbe. Written by ackoledged expert sin their field, these are very accessible and in no way daunting, but still give good information on species

A very good, reasonably priced series of books was published by Whittet Books. Updated and new editions are available. Written by acknowledged experts in their field, these are very accessible and in no way daunting, but still give good information on species. Some authors of these volumes also wrote the species accounts in The Handbook of British Mammals

Book in featured image:

The Handbook of British Mammals, G B Corbet and H N Southern. Blackwell Scientific Publications, second edition 1977. ISBN 0 632 09080 4

Gerard's Herbal

A library for botanists…

‘A Generall Historie of plantes’

or

Gerard’s Herbal

After identification manuals and handbooks, ecology guides, accounts of rare and unusual flowers, where should the botanist turn to next- How about a guide to what the ancients thought of as the various ‘vertues‘ of plants for food and health?

'That the traveller or wayfaring man that hathe the herb tied about him felleth no wearisomnesse at all; and that he who hathe it about him can be hurt by no poysonsome medicines, nor by any wilde beast, neither yet by the Sun it selfe'- dubious advice from Gerard

Mugwort- ‘That the traveller or wayfaring man that hathe the herb tied about him feeleth no wearisomnesse at all; and that he who hathe it about him can be hurt by no poysonsome medicines, nor by any wilde beast, neither yet by the Sun it selfe’- dubious advice from Gerard

Apparently the longest book in print after the Bible, Gerard’s Herbal is a fascinating concoction of fact, local lore, nonsense and downright dangerous advice. John Gerard was an Elizabethan physician, herbalist and botanist who tended Lord Burleigh’s gardens. In 1597 he published his famous Historie of Plantes and this informed and led the way for just about every herbal that followed. This is, of course, to ignore the fact that Gerard heavily ‘borrowed’ much of his work from others, particularly that of Rembert Dodoens. The woodcuts for the drawings were widely sourced and are probably amongst the finest of their day.

There have been a number of herbals published over the years, and countless new editions of some of the older ones. Some later editions have heavily abridged the original text or work, printing of the old plates has also suffered in some later volumes. You can pay a lot of money for a good, early copy, but with care, there are some more reasonably priced editions to be found. There are also good modern herbals though Three Points of the Compass has not really gone down that route, preferring a modern day botanists’ view on what our forebears had to say. For example, I grew up with David Bellamy on the television, his particular favourite herbalist was Culpeper. It is good that someone has time for these almost forgotten men. Bellamy tells us that apparently Culpeper himself, is buried somewhere beneath platform 11 of Liverpool Street station, London.

Potentially of more practical use than an old herbal, is Blooming Bellamy, the book that accompanied David Bellamy's BBC series, first broadcast in 1993. It is still worth watching if only for the howlingly funny view of an 'aging botanish' crawling arounf the feet of commuters on a railway station platform, while extolling the virtues of the plants to be found there

Potentially of more practical use than an old herbal, is Blooming Bellamy, the book that accompanied David Bellamy’s BBC series, first broadcast in 1993. It is still worth watching if only for the howlingly funny view of an ‘ageing botanist’ crawling around the feet of commuters on a railway station platform, while extolling the virtues of the plants to be found there

Book in featured image:

Gerard’s Herbal. The History of Plants. John Gerard. Bracken Books, 1985 edition. ISBN 0 946495 27 0

Three Points of the Compass purchased a digital copy of Culpepper's Herbal for diverting reading, though I am not sure I'll be following much of the advice- "the juice of the leaves, or rather the roots themselves, given to drink with old wine, doth wonderfully help the biting of any serpents: and the root beaten with a little salt, and laid on the place, suddenly eases the pain thereof, and helps those that are bit by a mad dog"

Three Points of the Compass purchased a digital copy of Culpepper’s Herbal for diverting reading, though I am not sure I’ll be following much of the advice- “the juice of the leaves, or rather the roots themselves, given to drink with old wine, doth wonderfully help the biting of any serpents: and the root beaten with a little salt, and laid on the place, suddenly eases the pain thereof, and helps those that are bit by a mad dog”

 

Birds of the Western Palearctic

A library for ornithologists…

Birds of the Western Palearctic

If you can afford them, then anyone that is keen to fill space on their bookshelves with an authoritative set of volumes on the avifauna of the Western Palearctic or any sub-region of that area, should be purchasing the BWP.

Birds of the Western Palearctic, volume IV

Birds of the Western Palearctic, volume IV

Birds of the Western Palearctic, or to give its full title- Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic, or BWP for short, was a masterful exercise in producing a comprehensive regional guide to the birds of a particular region, in this case, the Western Palearctic. I have the complete nine volumes however a two volume concise edition was published in 1998, I don’t have that as I have no need for it.

Obviously there have been advances in our knowledge of some of these species. For example various taxonomic changes have taken place in the intervening years.

Following the release of volume IX of BWP, from 1997-2004, there were published updates- BWP Update. These would occasionally include improved plates showing some species, but can be a tad difficult to get hold of now.

There were also a couple of electronic versions released and a fair amount of the text can be found online, but there is little to actually beat the not-inconsiderable heft of the full nine volume set.

Pages from Birds of the Western Palearctic, Volume IX Buntings and New World Warblers

Pages from Birds of the Western Palearctic, Volume IX Buntings and New World Warblers

Not only are these large and heavy volumes, but they are not cheap either. Remarkably, soon after the final volume was published in 1994, I was able to pick up the entire nine volume set at a remaindered price of twenty five quid! For me, it was the bargain of the decade.

The Handbook of British Birds, (published 1938-41) by HF Witherby et al were masterful works in their time. I have four of the five volumes published. Pioneering as they were, they set a standard that BWP more than supplanted

The Handbook of British Birds, (published 1938-41) by HF Witherby et al were masterful works in their time. I have four of the five volumes published. Pioneering as they were, they set a standard that BWP more than supplanted

Be warned, these books are not easy to wade through. You have to understand their layout and deal with the constant referencing in the text. The printed sonograms are also now largely superfluous as there are excellent aural guides now available. The region chosen, the Western Palearctic is somewhat arbitrary as birds do not see geographical barriers beyond extensive mountain ranges of oceans, and even then, not for all species. But still, they are masterful reference works and signify a massive step-forward from the pioneering work produced by earlier ornithologists such as Witherby and Jourdain.

Books in featured image:

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume I. Ostriches to Ducks. Edited by: Stanley Cramp. Oxford University Press, 1977: ISBN 978-0-19-857358-6, 722 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume II Hawks to Bustards. Edited by: Stanley Cramp. Oxford University Press, 1980: ISBN 978-0-19-857505-4, 696 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume III Waders to Gulls. Edited by: Stanley Cramp. Oxford University Press, 1983: ISBN 978-0-19-857506-1, 913 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume IV Terns to Woodpeckers. Edited by: Stanley Cramp. Oxford University Press, 1985: ISBN 978-0-19-857507-8, 960 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western PalearcticVolume V Tyrant Flycatchers to Thrushes. Edited by: Stanley Cramp. Oxford University Press, 1988: ISBN 978-0-19-857508-5, 1136 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume VI. Warblers. Edited by: Stanley Cramp and Duncan J Brooks. Oxford University Press, 1992: ISBN 978-0-19-857509-2, 760 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western PalearcticVolume VII. Flycatchers to Shrikes. Edited by: Stanley Cramp, Christopher M Perrins and Duncan J Brooks. Oxford University Press, 1993: ISBN 978-0-19-857510-8, 610 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume VIII. Crows to Finches. Edited by: Stanley Cramp, Christopher M Perrins and Duncan J Brooks. Oxford University Press, 1994: ISBN 978-0-19-854679-5, 956 pages

Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume IX, Buntings and New World Warblers. Edited by: Stanley Cramp, Christopher M Perrins and Duncan J Brooks. Oxford University Press, 1994: ISBN 978-0-19-854843-0, 522 pages

BWP, find space for it on your bookshelves...

BWP, find space for it on your bookshelves…

South, by Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton

A library for those who hike in the shadow of giants…

South

Ernest Shackleton

“For a joint scientific and geographical piece of organisation, give me Scott; for a Winter Journey, Wilson; for a dash to the Pole and nothing else, Amundsen: and if I am in the devil of a hole and want to get out of it, give me Shackleton every time”

Apsley Cherry-Garrard, The Worst Journey in the World

If ever there was a boyhood hero, then Ernest Shackleton was mine. Such qualities and achievements to aspire to- expedition leader, navigator, single minded, resourceful, determined, famous traveller and adventurer, epic failure- OK, perhaps not the last. But still, a national hero.

Part of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration Shackleton made various journeys to the Antarctic. After accompanying Scott on part of his Discovery Expedition (1901-1903), Shackleton led the Nimrod Expedition (1907-1909) followed by the ‘Endurance‘ Expedition (1914-1917). Leaving aside his final incomplete Quest Expedition, on which he died of a heart attack aged 47, at South Georgia, the sensational Endurance expedition of 1914-1917 was, and is, the stuff of legend.

In 1914 Sir Ernest Shackleton announced to the world his intention to trek 1800 miles from the Atlantic to the Pacific via the South Pole. However the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition became something entirely different, a fight for survival.

South is beautifully presented and the evocative photographs taken by the young Frank Hurley compliment Shackleton's diary account admirably

South is beautifully presented and the evocative photographs taken by the young Frank Hurley compliment Shackleton’s diary account admirably. Accompanying images add to the authority of this volume

His ship Endurance became ice-locked for several months before being crushed by the ice and sinking. Forced to take to the ice, Shackleton and his crew of twenty-eight were adrift on an ice floe so had to take to sea off the tip of the Antarctic peninsula on lifeboats reaching Elephant Island five days later. On an isolated island with no hope of rescue, Shackleton and five others later navigated their way across open sea and landed at South Georgia Island after 720 miles.

“We would take three days’ provision for each man in the shape of sledging rations and biscuit…then we were to take the Primus lamp filled with oil, the small cookers, the carpenter’s adze (for use as an ice axe), and the alpine rope, which made a total length of fifty feet when knotted… the carpenter assisted me in putting several screws in the sole of each boot with the object of providing a grip on the ice”

Ernest Shackleton, preparing for the journey across the mountains of South Georgia

Shackleton and two others then made the first land crossing on foot of the island in order to reach help at the whaling station at Stromness. He was then able to return and rescue the remainder of his men from Elephant Island, later also rescuing another party from the expedition, the Ross Sea Party stranded in McMurdo Sound.

The title says it all! South is a more lavishly illustrated version of the excellent earlier volume Endurance by Alfred Lansing

The title says it all! South is a more lavishly illustrated version of the excellent earlier volume Endurance by Alfred Lansing

It is a gripping and thrilling story. The book shown at the head of this post is the best illustrated account I have come across. South is a first person account by Shackleton, accompanied by photographs from Frank Hurley, the expedition photographer and paintings by expedition leader George Marston. The whole book is also enlivened by modern colour photographs. It is not just Shackleton’s story, but of survival in the face of death and of all the resourceful and brave men on the expedition.

There have been many accounts of Shackelton's life and expeditions by both expedition memembers and later historians. Possibly the best biography of the man himself though, was by Roland Huntford

There have been many accounts of Shackelton’s life and expeditions by both expedition members and later historians. Possibly the best biography of the man himself though, was by Roland Huntford

Book in featured image:

South. The Illustrated story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917. Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton. Zenith Press, an imprint of Quarto Publishing Group. 2016. ISBN 978 0 7603 5025 6

Pulling a selection of Shire publications from my book shelf

A library for historians…

‘Shire’ publications

So far, in this series of posts looking at various books pulled from my book shelves, there have been a number of slim little volumes scattered through the larger books present. I have been voluble in my praise for them as, invariably, they maintain a high standard and fill those annoying little niches of curiosity which so few other books seem to cover.

Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to meet John Rotheroe, the man who, with John Hinton, founded Shire Publications in 1962. He was a lovely chap, amiable and justly proud of how niche some of his titles were. Small, well priced, non-fiction and written by experts in their field, there have been an astonishing number of subjects covered in over a thousand books published. I am fortunate enough to have been asked to write on two subjects myself (of which I have snuck in a single volume here). John has long since retired (2007) and the Shire volumes are now published by Bloomsbury Publishing.

Following our meeting in c1992, Shire Publisher John Rotheroe was kind enough to send me a small gift, a bibliography of the Shire publications, it has expanded dramatically in the intervening years

Following our meeting in c1992, Shire Publisher John Rotheroe was kind enough to send me a small gift, a bibliography of the Shire publications, it has expanded dramatically in the intervening years

Many of the books published cover subjects of interest to anyone that travels through this country and has even a vague interest of what he or she sees. I show above just a few from my shelves that have helped answer my questions hiking in Britain. Such is the appeal of many Shire books to me that I find I frequently snap up a title if I am in any way intrigued or interested in a subject. Long may they continue in order that I can carry on doing so.

Somehow, a non-Shire title slipped into this post. Place Names of the Lake District is an equally good read and is listed below.

Books in featured image:

Quarries and Quarrying, Shire Album 134, Peter Stanier, Shire Publications, 2000 reprint. ISBN 0 85263 728 4

Telephone Boxes, Shire Library 303, Neil Johannessen, Shire Publications, second edition 2010 reprint. ISBN 13; 978 0 74780 419 2

Old Letter Boxes, Martin Robinson, Shire Publications, second edition 2000 reprint. ISBN 0 7478 0446 X

The Village Shop, Shire Library 466, Lin Bensley, AShire Publications, 2008. ISBN 13; 978 0 7478 0675 2

Milestones, Shire Album 401, Mervyn Benford, Shire Publications, 2002. ISBN 0 7478 0526 1

Canal Narrowboats and Barges, Shire Album 427, Tony Conder, Shire Publications, 2004. ISBN 0 7478 0587 3

Dry Stone Walls, Shire Album 114, Lawrence Garner, Shire Publications, second edition 2005 reprint. ISBN 0 7478 0620 9

Fields, Hedges and Ditches, Shire Library 21, Nigel Harvey, Shire Publications 1976, Print on Demand 2014. ISBN 978 85263 868 2

Tins and Tin Mining, Shire Album 139, R L Atkinson, Shire Publications, 1989 reprint. ISBN 0 85263 733 0

Prehistoric Henges, Shire Archaeology 66, Aubrey Burl, Shire Publications, 1997 reprint, ISBN 0 7478 0123 1

Roman Roads in Britain, Shire Archaeology 90, Hugh Davies, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016 reprint, ISBN 13: 978 0 74780 690 5

Prehistoric Stone Circles, Shire Archaeology 9, Aubrey Burl, Shire Publications, fourth edition 2005. ISBN 0 7478 0609 8

Making Sense of the Place Names of The Lake District, David Watson, Photoprint Scotland, 2009. ISBN 978 0 9559438 4 3

Post Offices, Shire Library 594, Julian Stray, Shire Publications, 2010. ISBN 13: 978 0 74780 785 8

Kitchen Walled Gardens, Shire Album 339, Susan Campbell, Shire Publications, 2002 reprint. ISBN 0 7478 0369 2

Road Signs, Shire Album 402, Stuart Hands, Shire Publications, 2005 reprint. ISBN 13; 978 7478 0531 8

Capability Brown, Lifelines 33, Joan Clifford, Shire Publications, 2001 reprint. ISBN 0 85263 274 6

Funicular Railways, Shire Album 240, John Woodhams, Shire Publications, 1989. ISBN 0 7478 0040 5

Bricks and Brickmaking, Shire Library 75, Martin Hammond, Shire Publications, 2009 reprint, Print on Demand 2012. ISBN 978 74780 067 5

Limekilns and Limeburning, Shire Library 236, Richard Williams, Shire Publications, 2004 second edition, Print on Demand 2011. ISBN 978 74780 596 0

Pillboxes and Tank Traps, Shire Library 787, Bernard Lowry, Bloomsbury Publications, 2014. ISBN 13; 978 0 74781 356 9

 

 

Granite and Grit, Ronald Turnbull

A library for geologists…

Granite and Grit

A walker’s guide to the geology of British Mountains

Ronald Turnbull

“Walking up Slieve Donard from Newcastle, I noticed that the character of the stream had changed altogether; instead of little romantic waterfalls, it was running down grey slabs in wide watersplashes. I backtracked down the path, to see in the riverbed the actual line where the dark shale butted up against smooth pale granite. I could even stand with my feet in a few centimetres of water and 250 million years apart…”

Ronald Turnbull

Ronald Turnbull does not profess to be a geologist, instead he stands proud as a hillwalker who likes to know what is going on under his feet. However I think he does a pretty damn good job in Granite and Grit at both explaining and illustrating ‘the seventeen types of stone that make up Britain’s mountains’.

Over a series of chapters, Ronald Turnbull works through the various rocks from which the (mostly) tall bits of Britain are made of. Here, in chapter four, he looks at the dramatic three tiers of Torridon- the Lewisian Gneiss, the Torridonian sandstone and the white Cambrian quartzite, all of which make this part of the UK a remarkable place to visit, all the more so with some understanding of the rocks on which you stand

Over a series of chapters, Ronald Turnbull works through the various rocks from which the (mostly) tall bits of Britain are made of. Here, in chapter four, he looks at the dramatic three tiers of Torridon- the Lewisian Gneiss, the Torridonian sandstone and the white Cambrian quartzite, which make this part of the UK a remarkable place to visit, all the more so with some understanding of the rocks on which you stand

Three Points of the Compass visited Torridon in 2012, if only I had read this book before

Three Points of the Compass visited Torridon in 2012, if only I had read this book before instead of relying on sketchy memory of Earth Sciences courses, years before

The book is lavishly illustrated with, mostly, good photographs, easy to understand diagrams and Ronald’s easy going, explanatory and anecdotal writing style. It is so well written that it is not necessarily a book to dip into, though it could be, it stands up to be read through in its own right. A walker’s perspective of the geology beneath our feet makes for a refreshing change in books of this nature. Thoroughly recommended.

If you enjoy a ramble up the mountains with Ronald Turnbull, why not go and dip your toes in the sea with him with another of his books- Sand Stone and Sea Stacks does an admirable job of looking at how the sea has shaped and continues to shape and create the coastline encircling our island

If you enjoy a clamber up the mountains with Ronald Turnbull, why not go and dip your toes in the sea with him with another of his books- Sand Stone and Sea Stacks does an admirable job of looking at how the sea has shaped and continues to shape and create the coastline encircling our island

“From the gneiss to the Ice Age, the rocks, boulders and screes of the UK are more varied and enticing than those of any other country. This book is your User’s Guide”

Ronald Turnbull, from the Introduction to Granite and Grit

Book in featured image:

Granite and Grit. A walker’s guide to the geology of British Mountains, Ronald Turnbull. Francis Lincoln, 2011 paperback edition. ISBN 978 0 7112 3180 1