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Gear talk- butane canister converter nozzles

Many will be aware that lindal valve gas canisters can be expensive, while bayonet connector butane cartridges can be much more affordable. There is a cheap, tiny, copper transfer nozzle available for putting the contents of one, in to the other…

copper nozzle
Chinese text under a phone's Google Translate
Chinese text under a phone’s Google Translate

Using Google Translate the chinese script on the little baggie that this tool comes in tells us little- “golden outdoor gas tank transfer ventilation nozzle”. There are the usual safety caveats- you shouldn’t use one, you shouldn’t refill gas canisters, you shouldn’t overfill gas canisters, this is a potentially dangerous procedure. Three Points of the Compass recommends you do not use one of these transfer nozzles. If you do use one, use it outdoors, well-ventilated and away from naked flame.

These little tools are cheap, very cheap. I think mine cost just a couple of quid off Amazon. Churned out by the thousand in some workshop far overseas. There are just two metal parts to this little gas transfer nozzle. The one unscrews from the other and inside is a small rubber O-ring that forms a gas tight seal against a butane cartridge nozzle when pushed firmly home. Another O-ring sits over the tube that is inserted into a lindal valve, as found on most backpacking gas stove canisters. Often, a couple of spare O-rings are supplied with these little nozzles when purchased.

The necessary tool to transfer gas from a cartridge to a canister
The necessary tool to transfer gas from a butane cartridge to a canister
Pushed on to the bayonet of a butane gas cartridge there will be a brief venting of gas
Pushed on to the bayonet of a butane gas cartridge there will be a brief venting of gas
With the transfer nozzle inserted onto the catridge bayonet, offer to the lindal valve
Recipient canister should be flat and on the ground or a raised surface
Recipient canister should be flat and on the ground or a raised surface
With the transfer nozzle inserted onto the cartridge bayonet, offer to the lindal valve
There will be a brief venting of gas when pushed home, this will quickly cease
There will be a brief venting of gas when pushed home, this will quickly cease
Firmly press and hold the donor cartridge down while the liquid gas transfers
Firmly press and hold the donor cartridge down while the liquid gas transfers

It is important not to overfill a recipient canister. Being aware of the empty weight and periodically weighing the canister during the transfer process will ensure it is not dangerously overfilled, which could cause the dished base to ‘pop’, or the canister to explode. No more than 80% of the usual filled capacity is advisable. Chilling the recipient gas canister in the freezer for 15 minutes will aid in the transfer but is not always necessary.

A brief piece of film speaks volumes….

Three Points of the Compass has shown some gas canister adapters here, also a G-Works gas saver that can be used with one of those adapters to transfer gas from a butane cartridge to a lindal valve canister, that is a fairly bulky and heavy option to take on trail. This little contraption could potentially be slipped into a ditty bag on a longer trail or trip where the availabilty of gas canister types is uncertain as it weighs just 6g and measures 9.5mm x 17.5mm. There are many suppliers of these little transfer nozzles and I am sure that machining will vary. It is possible that tolerances and maker variance may not permit this to be used with every lindal canister.

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