Looking at my Z Packs Duplex tent

 

Three Points of the Compass had just a couple of hours over this weekend to put up the newly purchased Z Packs Duplex tent. As number one daughter was visiting, we took time out to visit mother/grandmother and put the tent up in her garden. Daughter climbed inside and pronounced the tent as ‘weird’. What does she know!

Duplex Tent from Z Packs is quick and easy to erect

Duplex Tent from Z Packs is quick and easy to erect

Z Packs say that trekking poles should be set to around 48 inches (122cm) to erect the tent, which is handy as that is the default length of my Pacer Poles for hiking. No zips are included on the two sets of doors, instead there is a toggle at half height and a small metal clip for fixing one or both doors to at the bottom. So, less weight and less to go wrong, combined with greater airflow to keep the condensation down.

One storm door rolled back, there is a lot of room in each vestibule and the bucket ground sheet rises up quite some height from the ground

One storm door rolled back, there is a lot of room in each vestibule and the bucket ground sheet rises up quite some height from the ground

The camo version I purchased is not too militaristic and seems to do a pretty good job of providing a little discreetness inside. This was something I had been slightly concerned with as I am likely to find myself using this tent frequently on public, family camp sites as well as stealth camping where privacy is of less concern.

Three Points of the Compass is a big chap and six feet tall (or long). There is plenty of room at both foot and head when lying on a full length Thermarest X-Therm

Three Points of the Compass is a big chap and six feet tall (or long). There is plenty of room at both foot and head when lying on a full length Thermarest X-Therm

The rainbow zippers on the mesh screens each side work well and the small size mesh looks more than adequate to deny the Scottish Midge entrance. As a first glance, I am very, very pleased with my Duplex. I am very much looking forward to trying it out ‘in anger’. This tent will be home for a great many nights on my long walk next year. The additional space offered is going to go some way preventing myself from going stir crazy if storm bound etc.

Having removed a small roll of repair tape included in the tent and a little paperwork that came with it. I have repacked the tent into a newly purchased cuben long, thin dry bag from Z Packs. Total weight, minus poles and pegs is 632g

Having removed a small roll of repair tape included in the tent and a little paperwork that came with it. I have repacked the tent into a newly purchased cuben, long, thin dry bag from Z Packs. Total weight, minus poles and pegs is 632g

 

 

3 thoughts on “Looking at my Z Packs Duplex tent

  1. Pingback: Pegging down the pegs | Three Points of the Compass

  2. kitsambler

    Thanks for this post. Did the Pacer Poles worked out ok for you in the longer term? I have them, love them, and am wondering how they work with the Duplex.

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    1. Jools Post author

      Kitsambler, I have always being a fan of the Pacer Poles. I used Leki for a while but find the angled grip of the Pacers ideal for me. I have completed way in excess of a two thousand miles with mine. I do wish they were flick lock rather than twist, as I have found that they can bind up on just a few occasions, mostly when locked early in the morning when it is cold and prove difficult to unlock when things have warmed up. The EVA foam handles on the shafts are good for ascending steeper sections too. I wrote to Heather at Pacer to request a flick lock version of the alloy poles to be made (to no avail) and mentioned, in passing, that the internal expanding bolts were beginning to wear. Immediate reply, unbidden, asking for my address to send new and replacement bottom sections, free of charge. Quite excellent customer service. As to using these poles with the Duplex, they are an ‘odd’ shape handle and I did wonder if they would fit into the ‘cup’ of the Duplex well or not. They do. I do not even notice any issue. The toughened, extra thickness of cuben that the ‘cup’ is constructed of is easily large enough to accommodate the handles of the Pacer Poles. I continue to use alloy Pacers rather than switch to the far lighter carbon versions as I reckon the alloys are a tougher product. The last thing I want is a broken pole shaft when I need both poles to erect a tent that night!

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